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Board & Committee Vacancies

Volunteer with us! Warwick Township is looking for resident volunteers to fill the following vacancies:

  • Zoning Hearing Board Alternate Member
  • Tree Committee Member

Please submit a letter of interest and related qualifications/resume to Skye Sorresso, Assistant to the Manager, at ssorresso@warwickbucks.gov.

Fireworks – Frequency Asked Questions

House Bill 542 was signed into law on October 30, 2017. Under this new PA state law, the Fireworks Act of 1939 was repealed and replaced in its entirety.

Q: Which fireworks are Pennsylvania residents now allowed to purchase and use?

A: Consumers can now purchase and use “Class C” or “consumer grade” fireworks that include firecrackers, Roman Candles, bottle rockets and similar fireworks that contain a maximum of 50 milligrams of explosive material. The expansion includes those fireworks that were previously available to out-of-state residents only.

Display Fireworks”, which are classified as (including) salutes that contain more than two grains or 130 milligrams of explosive materials and professional grade aerial shells containing more than 60 grams of pyrotechnic compositions are still only allowed to be used by professionals with a Permit.

Q: Who can purchase fireworks?

A:  Anyone over 18 years of age can purchase them

Q:  What are the restrictions of where they can be used?

A:  They cannot be ignited or discharged on public or private property without express permission of the property owner;

They cannot be discharged from or within a motor vehicle or building;

They cannot be discharged toward a motor vehicle or building;

They cannot be discharged within 150 feet of an occupied structure;

They cannot be discharged while the person is under the influence of alcohol, a controlled substance or another drug.

Alkaline Battery and Incandescent Light Bulb Recycling Now Available in Township Lobby

Did you know that most residential recycling services don’t accept batteries, shopping bags, or light bulbs?

According to the EPA, about 86,000 tons of alkaline batteries end up in landfills each year. In May 2021, Warwick Township purchased dedicated containers to collect these hard-to-recycle items.

Located toward the rear of the Township Administration Building lobby, residents are invited to deposit their alkaline batteries and incandescent light bulbs into the bins.

Once the containers have been filled, they will be shipped back to Terracycle, a company dedicated to diverting millions of pounds of resources from landfills.

 

What items are acceptable?

Bin 1

  • Alkaline Batteries
    • No Lithium Batteries
    • No Rechargeable Batteries
  • Bin 2
  • Incandescent Light Bulbs
    • No LED Bulbs
    • No Fluorescent,  Bulbs
    • No Halogen Bulbs

Bin Location: Township Building – 1733 Township Greene, Jamison, PA 18929

Philly Workers Who Stayed Home May Be Due a Wage Tax Refund

Philly Workers Who Stayed Home May Be Due a Wage Tax Refund

Has your home turned into an office during the last year? With the pandemic forcing many people to work from home, thousands in our area are no longer commuting to work. For those who in the past commuted to Philadelphia, there is yet another benefit to working from home beyond saving time, gas, and tolls: a tax refund.

Anyone who works in Philadelphia and lives elsewhere is subject to pay the non-resident Philadelphia Wage Tax, which stands at a hefty 3.5019% of gross wages. Nearly all municipalities in the Philadelphia area levy an Earned Income Tax (EIT), with most topping out at 1%. Residents living in the suburbs are subject to this lower rate EIT where they live- unless they work in Philadelphia. However, with many required to work from their homes during the last year, they may no longer be subject to the Philadelphia Wage Tax while telecommuting.

Is it worth the effort to pursue a refund? The simple answer is yes! Someone working from home in the suburbs during the pandemic making $60,000 per year would be subject to their home municipality’s EIT, which is typically 1%. In the span of one year, this would equal a savings of about $1,500! Plus, the 1% you contribute to your local EIT will be invested into public safety and infrastructure improvements into the community you and your family lives.

How do you take advantage of this? For any amount of time a Philadelphia job was completed at a home outside of the city limits, they may request a Wage Tax refund from the City of Philadelphia.  When submitting a tax return to Keystone Collections, the tax officer for all EIT in Bucks County, use the Out-Of-State Tax Credit Worksheet on Line 12 of the tax return form if you need to receive a tax credit for the time you did not work in Philadelphia.

For anyone who continues working from their home outside of the City of Philadelphia, they should submit a Residency Certification Form to their employer and request that their local EIT be deducted from their wages instead of the City Wage tax. A political subdivision (PSD) code will be needed for the form, which can be found using this tool.